The Beck 
History 
This small chalk-fed stream rises in Newbald and flows south towards Ellerker before joining the Humber at Brough. Our mire and beck flows past Mires Beck Nursery and is closely managed by the East Yorkshire Rivers Trust. The Chalk Wolds of East Yorkshire are an important source of highly prized spring fed rivers and streams. These watercourses make up a river system that forms the most northerly chalk rivers in Europe. The East Yorkshire chalk rivers are important for wildlife including the rare Otter and Water Vole. The chalk rivers are under increasing threat from water abstraction, land drainage, agricultural run-off, flood defences and urban development. 
 
Activities 
Our events are currently on hold due to the Coronavirus pandemic. We are hoping to resume our events on the beck once it is safe to do so. 
Some of the activities that Mires Beck Nursery do are: 
Making rafts out of natural materials on site in different teams and then racing them down the beck to see which teams raft is the fastest. 
Conservation work at the bank 
Seed gathering 
During events week there will be some games played 
During the summer we host events that the public can come and get involved in such as duck racing 
Wildflowers that grow around our beck 
Some of the wildflowers that are grown around the Mires Beck are: 
genus Scrophularia - Figwort 
genus Carex - Carex Pendula 
Caltha palustris - Marsh Marigold 
genus Arctium - Bird Ox 
Filipendula ulmaria - Meadowsweet 
Myosotis scorpioides - Water Forget-me-not 
Lotus pedunculatus - Greater Birdsfoot Trefoil 
Tanacetum vulgare - Tansy 
Hypericum perforatum - St John's-wort 
Conservation 
While there are no species which are endemic to chalk streams, these rivers provide optimal habitat for a number of England’s iconic and indicator species. In their healthy state, chalk stream flows are: 
Clean – excellent for trout and salmon; 
Alkaline and high in calcium carbonate – excellent for invertebrates; 
Cool and well oxygenated – excellent for fish fry; 
Consistently strong – excellent for macrophytes such as water crowfoot 
The aquatic plants are the ‘hedgerows’ of the river, providing the in-stream habitat on which everything else depends. The fish fry and invertebrates are excellent food sources for insects and birds, mammals and amphibians. The chalk also acts as a buffer against floods and droughts, which means that they provide good refuge for flow vulnerable species such as water vole. 
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